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Station Alphabet communicates a new railway architectural language

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December 14 2020

Station Alphabet communicates a new railway architectural language

3DReid Architects have shared their entry in a Network Rail design competition to pave the way for a new generation of community-oriented British railway stations.

Updating an off the shelf approach, most recently deployed at Inverness Airport, the initiative seeks to evolve station design with a new architectural language to help unify the network and encourage complementary uses such as the popular Inn at Corrour Station.

In response, 3DReid have come up with Station Alphabet, a modular timber design with sufficient flexibility for local variations in style and accommodation.

Conceived as a three-dimensional interpretation of the 'double arrow' railway logo first developed in the 1960s the design centres on repeatable 3m modules which can be left open or infilled with bracing elements following the same overarching geometry.

Individual units can serve as welfare accommodation for staff or passenger amenity with the option to link up multiple modules using engineered timber for longer spans which could accommodate alternate uses such as bicycle repair shops and cafes.

Such spaces could aid a reorientation of stations away from the tracks towards surrounding settlements as the face of an arrivals courtyard, dispensing with the car parks and taxi ranks which typify current approaches.

Scalable between small and medium-sized stations the design could be rolled out as a simple windbreak wall and lamp standards at its most basic through to larger configurations incorporating station buildings and a footbridge.

Complementary usage could drive a more outward-focussed network
Complementary usage could drive a more outward-focussed network
The kit of parts would be scalable between small and medium-sized stations
The kit of parts would be scalable between small and medium-sized stations

8 Comments

alyn walsh
#1 Posted by alyn walsh on 14 Dec 2020 at 17:10 PM
Timber ?...in Scotland ? What a absolute maintenance nighmare for Network rail....
HMR
#2 Posted by HMR on 15 Dec 2020 at 08:47 AM
Looks great, gets away from that gullwing grey painted steel everywhere.
Graeme McCirmuck
#3 Posted by Graeme McCirmuck on 15 Dec 2020 at 11:25 AM
It never rains in Scotland
platform etiquette
#4 Posted by platform etiquette on 15 Dec 2020 at 12:07 PM
Decent designs, but more importantly... Image 2 - the 1970's guy in high heels and bicycle lady's over the shoulder 'come hither' glance?? Dangerous and subversive.
MV
#5 Posted by MV on 16 Dec 2020 at 10:54 AM
Fair to say that it didn’t make the shortlist...

With so many sites across the UK, I guess its difficult to find a concept that will be appropriate everywhere. However, using the network rail logo for the concept is... work experience level of thought? I look forward to seeing the proposals of the 5 shortlisted practices.
Graeme McCirmuck
#6 Posted by Graeme McCirmuck on 16 Dec 2020 at 11:43 AM
It never rains in Scotland
Spacey Davey
#7 Posted by Spacey Davey on 16 Dec 2020 at 23:39 PM
Why would people use the train when they have hover-bikes?
Nairn's Bairn
#8 Posted by Nairn's Bairn on 17 Dec 2020 at 10:25 AM
#4 I think the 1970s guy is actually a lady - it's not actually a moustache. But yes, pleasingly retro figure-sourcing.

A previous practice I worked in had two standard figures - 'Victorian balloon-seller' and 'group of sitting children' that appeared in everything. Bizarre. And seagulls, always seagulls.

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