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Mackintosh architecture students reimagine Antwerp, Glasgow & New Lanark

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June 5 2019

Mackintosh architecture students reimagine Antwerp, Glasgow & New Lanark

Students of the Mackintosh School of Architecture have focussed their attention on a series of speculative propositions for Antwerp, Glasgow and New Lanark for this year’s degree show.

Stage 5 designs were handed the port city of Flanders, Belgium, for their canvas as part of their myths modernity and metamorphosis brief from which a series of plans, section models and other materials have been created for the exhibition.

Stage 4 students meanwhile were handed a brief closer to home at Tradeston and the Broomielaw in Glasgow with instructions to design new housing and urban interventions to help draw the edge locations back into the heart of the city as a creative centre.
Finally, stage 3 students were asked to conceive of a historic boat recovery centre on the River Clyde at Bowling, providing infrastructure for the recovery and restoration of significant vessels.

Last but not least Stage 2 students examined Robert Owen’s legacy at New Lanark by bringing forward a range of ideas to accommodate arts and crafts activities, community gardening and the return of specialist manufacturing.

Jane Masters, heritage master at New Lanark Trust and a former student herself, said: “ “As the Trust enters the delivery phase of its new World Heritage Site Management Plan, 2019-2023, it is wonderful for us to see the potential, both real and speculative, which others see in the site.

“The Trust has always aimed to run New Lanark as a living and working village, and not merely as a museum dedicated to the past so a project like this, which takes the historic ethos of the site, and applies it to 21st century issues, is food for thought for the future of the village.”

The designs will go on public display within the Bourdon Building within the schools Garnethill campus until 9 June with stage 5 designs going on to be shown at Blueprint for the Future in London this July.

Design by Stage 4 Architecture student Adam Spreckley
Design by Stage 4 Architecture student Adam Spreckley
Design by Stage 4 Architecture student joshua Page
Design by Stage 4 Architecture student joshua Page

Design by Stage 4 Architecture student Mathew McCluskey
Design by Stage 4 Architecture student Mathew McCluskey
Design by Stage 4 Architecture student Rasita Artemjeva 1
Design by Stage 4 Architecture student Rasita Artemjeva 1

Design by Stage 4 Architecture student Rasita Artemjeva 2
Design by Stage 4 Architecture student Rasita Artemjeva 2
Design by Stage 4 Architecture student Sean Rees
Design by Stage 4 Architecture student Sean Rees

Design for a Boat Recovery Centre by Alice Miller (Stage 3)
Design for a Boat Recovery Centre by Alice Miller (Stage 3)
Design for a Boat Recovery Centre by Juliet Welshman (Stage 3)
Design for a Boat Recovery Centre by Juliet Welshman (Stage 3)

Design for a Boat Recovery Centre by Karlis Kukainis - Stage 3
Design for a Boat Recovery Centre by Karlis Kukainis - Stage 3
Design for an urban building on the Broomielaw by Stage 4 Architecture student Ella Walklate
Design for an urban building on the Broomielaw by Stage 4 Architecture student Ella Walklate

From Stage 5 Architecture student Hannah Dawood's Design Thesis
From Stage 5 Architecture student Hannah Dawood's Design Thesis
From Stage 5 Architecture student Jodie Wilson's Design Thesis
From Stage 5 Architecture student Jodie Wilson's Design Thesis

MSA Stage 2 student propositions for New Lanark (1)
MSA Stage 2 student propositions for New Lanark (1)
MSA Stage 2 student propositions for New Lanark (2)
MSA Stage 2 student propositions for New Lanark (2)

MSA Stage 2 student propositions for New Lanark (3)
MSA Stage 2 student propositions for New Lanark (3)

4 Comments

Derek Hill
#1 Posted by Derek Hill on 6 Jun 2019 at 08:37 AM
But no mention of Stage 1 which, I’m sure for many students, forms an important platform from which their studies develop.
Pleasantfield
#2 Posted by Pleasantfield on 6 Jun 2019 at 13:54 PM
Virtually every image shown is an interior. No focus on the outside and how the building is set in its surroumding environment. Function before form.
I see little to be encouraged about.
monkey9000
#3 Posted by monkey9000 on 6 Jun 2019 at 14:53 PM
Form ever follows function - everything to be exited about. We spend our lives inside buildings rather than outside in the rain.
Asimov
#4 Posted by Asimov on 7 Jun 2019 at 11:01 AM
#3 - It's Catch 22, as the interesting public space is very limited in Scotland. It's mostly due to poor alcohol consumption culture or misbehaviour, that you can't see as many outdoor offer for people to sit and contemplete the exteriors while enjoying themselves. And because there is almost nothing on offer (comparing with, say, continental Europe), people are forced to stay indoors. Weather is just a small factor to blame.

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