Newsletter - Links - Advertise - Contact Us - Cookies
 

Muse defend impact of Marischal Square on Provost Skene's House

Bookmark and Share | Send to friend

February 13 2015

Muse defend impact of Marischal Square on Provost Skene's House
A war of pictures has broken out between developers behind the planned redevelopment of Aberdeen’s Marischal Square and local campaigners fighting against the scheme with Muse illustrating the relationship of their proposals with the historic Provost Skene House and Marischal College.

Following concerns voiced that the £107m Halliday Fraser Munro scheme would obscure the oldest surviving house in the city backers insist that the property will be framed by a new vista from Broad Street.

Muse director Steve Turner claimed that reaction thus far has been ‘extremely encouraging’, adding: "We believe Marischal Square is a fantastic business location which will bring forward the much needed regeneration of this part of Aberdeen, with Marischal College at its heart."

Construction work is expected to get underway in March.
Campaigners argue that the setting of the second largest granite building in the world will be compromised
Campaigners argue that the setting of the second largest granite building in the world will be compromised
Muse insist that Provost Skene's House will be visible from Broad Street
Muse insist that Provost Skene's House will be visible from Broad Street

Muse insist that the setting of Provost Skene's house will be enhanced
Muse insist that the setting of Provost Skene's house will be enhanced

7 Comments

David
#1 Posted by David on 13 Feb 2015 at 15:14 PM
This fourth picture is an absolute con, and uses wide angle perspective CGI rendering to give an entirely false representation of how far the new hotel (ie where the camera position is) from Provost Skene's House. Sadly it's all too easy to con people with CGI images.

In Glasgow, the City Council Planning Department have taken it upon themselves to produce CGI images for important, sensitive projects, given an unbiased and more truthful representation of the reality of space.

I challenge MUSE to advise us all, via the masterplan, what the distance is between the hotel (which has quite rightly already been roundly slated on here for it's blandness) and Provost Skene's House. I suspect it certainly won't be any where near the distance that is depicted here.
Roddy
#2 Posted by Roddy on 14 Feb 2015 at 03:30 AM
David, if you are referring to GCC's use of the Glasgow Model you are incorrect in your assertion. Images produced in this manner are the result of a collaboration between the planning department and the applicant. In other words all visuals are agreed. This process can and frequently does include images which show the particular project off to its best advantage or which (at least in the eyes of the developer) the Planning Committee or public might find compelling. Even the inclusion of 'verifiable' or 'key' images are the product of a consensus between applicant/agent and the department.
Unbiased?...Certainly not. More truthful?... You'd need the services of a philosopher as well as a visualiser.
One thing I think we do agree on and which cannot be denied is that the images here presented give a fair indication of its lumpen banality.
Osbert Lancaster
#3 Posted by Osbert Lancaster on 16 Feb 2015 at 10:28 AM
HFM seem to have framed Provost Skene's house with the same sensitivity with which they framed the Triple Kirks spire.
David
#4 Posted by David on 16 Feb 2015 at 10:44 AM
Roddy,

Ok so maybe my point of reference (ie GCC example) is a poor one. I stand by my arguement though that what is portrayed here in the final image will be far from reality, and the historic building will feel more like it has been swamped by large buildings very close to it.
pedentic pete
#5 Posted by pedentic pete on 16 Feb 2015 at 13:16 PM
The main image is impossible; the elevation of Provost Skene's house in the image faces South East meaning that for the sun to be illuminating it from that angle it would have to be in the North East, from what looks like 11:00am in the morning looking at the shadow angles. In reality at this time of the day it would be closer to the South East and Provost Skenes house would be in the shadow cast by the office block. Just sayin.
Scott
#6 Posted by Scott on 16 Feb 2015 at 13:20 PM
The first image does nothing to convince people that Provost Skene's House has been considered carefully... If anything it looks more like they are planning to extend the building by adding on a storey?! A really bad judgement to include that image.
Shaun
#7 Posted by Shaun on 16 Feb 2015 at 13:23 PM
Simply put - you couldn't make it up.

Post your comments

 

All comments are pre-moderated and
must obey our house rules.

 

Back to February 2015

Search News
Subscribe to Urban Realm Magazine
Features & Reports
For more information from the industry visit our Features & Reports section.