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Industrial heritage to live on at Shrubhill Tram Depot

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November 20 2020

Industrial heritage to live on at Shrubhill Tram Depot

LDN Architects have come forward with revised proposals for a former tram depot at Shrubhill, Edinburgh, on behalf of Places for People.

The Engine Yard is already under construction and occupies a B-listed factory complex bounded by Dryden Street and Spey Terrace, abandoned since the late 1990s, of which all that remains are two red brick sheds, boundary walls and a chimney stack.

Planning had been granted in 2018 for a new building to bridge the void between both sheds but this has now been withdrawn in favour of more sympathetic interventions.

In a statement, the applicant wrote: "In our view, the previous scheme was rather unsympathetic to the buildings. It proposed new big openings on the west and east elevations that would have had a significant and negative impact on the original fabric. In our proposal, the new openings will reflect existing internal features."

A structural assessment of steel trusses found repair to be uneconomic and so new roofs will be built, retaining only central iron trusses in place which held up the roof lantern. New homes will abut existing brickwork of both the 'big' and 'wee' sheds with a full-height atrium left in the space between. These will be joined by a modern brick 'gap' building in the space between both.

Explaining the desire to signal a modern chapter in the history of the site LDN added: "The Gap Building complements the light-touch approach taken in the Big and Wee Sheds with a calm contemporary brick design. Slightly set back from the side elevations of the existing building, it emphasises the quality of the existing buildings and the modern character of the Gap Building by subtly separating old and new."

In all 43 homes will be created on the site from studio apartments through to three-bedroom flats.

A landmark chimney stands as an unmissable centrepiece
A landmark chimney stands as an unmissable centrepiece
A new roof will retain the profile of the larger shed but not the smaller one
A new roof will retain the profile of the larger shed but not the smaller one

Brickwork will be repaired, repointed and cleaned of graffiti
Brickwork will be repaired, repointed and cleaned of graffiti
Ornate iron columns will be retained as a link to the past
Ornate iron columns will be retained as a link to the past

5 Comments

TheFakeArchitect
#1 Posted by TheFakeArchitect on 23 Nov 2020 at 11:51 AM
Is that really the best proposal that can be achieved to link the two buildings together!
Craig Sanderson
#2 Posted by Craig Sanderson on 24 Nov 2020 at 16:32 PM
Interesting. Thanks. Has the tenure 'mix' been finalised? If so, how many flats will be for sale, how many for social rent and how many for mid-market rent?
Roysters
#3 Posted by Roysters on 24 Nov 2020 at 16:58 PM
Think I prefer the previous infill which had a more dynamic approach to this gap. Both designs turn their backs on Dryden St to some extent, but I guess the bins have got to go somewhere! Would have liked to have seen more public permeability through to Shrubhill from this side, unless this is some proposed further west on the site.
UR
#4 Posted by UR on 24 Nov 2020 at 17:01 PM
Hi Craig - 43 flats are proposed for the tram sheds, with 386 apartments being built on the site as a whole - 25% of all homes will be classed as affordable. I'm not sure what the proportion for sale and rent will be.
You for real..
#5 Posted by You for real.. on 24 Nov 2020 at 22:51 PM
#1. Perhaps not THE best but it's pretty good.

I'd keep the graffiti

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