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Kelvinhaugh mews homes evoke 19th-century blacksmiths

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July 31 2020

Kelvinhaugh mews homes evoke 19th-century blacksmiths

An infill development of four mews homes in Glasgow's Kelvinhaugh district is taking inspiration from the city's industrial heyday to provide a distinctive living space.

Led by Mitre Properties with O'DonnellBrown Architects the houses use clay facing brick to evoke the demolished Overnewton Works, established in the late 19th-century as a blacksmith and ironmongery. In the process, the site will be brought back to life as a constituent part of the developing Finnieston area.

Documents just filed with the city council show the upside-down homes locate sleeping areas on the ground floor, with dual aspect living areas above. Another key aspect of the devlopment will be the provision of cycling facilities to plug into the emerging Yorkhill and Kelvingrove Cycling Village, a district wide public realm initiative led by the local authority and Sustrans.

In a press statement, the practice wrote: "The principal elevation has a horizontal rhythm set by the roof terraces, fenestration and brick piers. It is animated with metalwork – balustrades, entrance gates, and boundary treatments – which will be light in colour and consistent with the window frames.

"The rear elevation faces onto a lane of tenements and has a greater vertical rhythm emphasised by narrower window openings. On the north elevation, brick planters create a line of separation between the lane and the dwellings."

All homes are being delivered with David Narro Associates engineers and KRAFT Architecture and Research as energy assessor.

2.1m high windows open onto private terraces
2.1m high windows open onto private terraces
Access to each property is made via a private entrance courtyard enclosed by brick pillar supporting upper-level terraces, contributing to a processional route of increasing privacy from street to porch
Access to each property is made via a private entrance courtyard enclosed by brick pillar supporting upper-level terraces, contributing to a processional route of increasing privacy from street to porch

Bedrooms will be positioned on the ground floor
Bedrooms will be positioned on the ground floor
Private bike storage is provided within each property, as well as a communal bike wash-down area, and a repair station within the residents’ shared garden.
Private bike storage is provided within each property, as well as a communal bike wash-down area, and a repair station within the residents’ shared garden.

5 Comments

Flappy MacFlaperson
#1 Posted by Flappy MacFlaperson on 31 Jul 2020 at 16:48 PM
More shoe-boxes yay!
Lee Grant
#2 Posted by Lee Grant on 31 Jul 2020 at 23:50 PM
Thank you for highlighting the Yorkhill and Kelvingrove Cycling Village Project. One thing to highlight, the initiative is actually led by the local community through the new Yorkhill Andrew Kelvingrove Development Trust and supported by Glasgow City Council and Sustrans. We were fortunate to have our bid selected in the Places for Everyone competition last year. As a group we are proud to help influence those who invest in our community.
James Hepburn
#3 Posted by James Hepburn on 1 Aug 2020 at 10:59 AM
Tiny little boxes.
jimbob tanktop
#4 Posted by jimbob tanktop on 1 Aug 2020 at 15:58 PM
I'd rather live in the 19th century blacksmith's, thanks.
Colin Baillie
#5 Posted by Colin Baillie on 3 Aug 2020 at 17:24 PM
Good work O'Donnel Brown. A challenging site, no doubt with a challenging brief. The external threshold spaces giving privacy to the front entranceways are a generosity that was likely hard-won. Continuation of the brick soldier courses across these is nice touch.

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