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See-through Newhaven home extension shows a light touch

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May 5 2020

See-through Newhaven home extension shows a light touch
A modest house extension in the conservation area of Newhaven, Edinburgh, has been unveiled by Glasgow architect Daniel Bar.
 
Standing as a direct replacement for an existing garage the lean-on living space comprises a ground-level horizontal volume connecting two large openings at either end, bounded by gable a boundary walls.
 
A new corridor connects to the existing entrance hall with the threshold between old and new marked by a step and framed down ceiling. Above this a triple-pitched roof opens vertically via a large skylight, affording privacy to a first-floor ensuite bathroom.
 
Bar wrote: "Upon entry, the angled wall following the set out of the site boundary line widens the perspective towards the main view. This emphasis in the orientation of the otherwise equally treated openings is further underlined by the direction of the laying pattern of the oak herringbone floor.
 
"An extension, by nature, will always be treated as a newcomer within the well established built context of this area. This project focuses on the intersection of being part of a place and creating its own environment at the same time."
 
Finished in black zinc the 32sq/m extension is stepped from a double-height frontage to a triple-height rear.
 
Images by Francesco Mariani Photography
A first-floor skylight adds atmosphere to the ensuite
A first-floor skylight adds atmosphere to the ensuite
A raised threshold marks transition between old and new elements of the home
A raised threshold marks transition between old and new elements of the home

Large oposing openings link views of a private park to the Firth of Forth
Large oposing openings link views of a private park to the Firth of Forth
The rear elevation is raised above a semi-sunken basement level
The rear elevation is raised above a semi-sunken basement level

12 Comments

The Bairn
#1 Posted by The Bairn on 5 May 2020 at 11:58 AM
I like this. Simple but surprisingly effective.
Well done. Only needs an appropriate set of blinds for that large rear window and its a winner!.
David
#2 Posted by David on 5 May 2020 at 12:06 PM
Cracking simple idea. Just need to move that sofa out way now...
mick
#3 Posted by mick on 5 May 2020 at 13:27 PM
Smile inducing sensitive extension countered by boke inducing architect's statement.
Gob_Bluth
#4 Posted by Gob_Bluth on 5 May 2020 at 15:04 PM
They definitely needed the space.
Cadmonkey
#5 Posted by Cadmonkey on 5 May 2020 at 15:22 PM
So proximity to boundary...
Is that fire rated glass?
BASARCH
#6 Posted by BASARCH on 5 May 2020 at 21:40 PM
Atmospheric roof light ........... really??
Inahuf
#7 Posted by Inahuf on 5 May 2020 at 22:06 PM
I see from the night shot that the neighbours have stuck up a scaffold to block the view into their garden. Not to worry there’ll be blinds up soon to reduce overheating as you can’t open the windows to vent the space.
FLW
#8 Posted by FLW on 5 May 2020 at 23:41 PM
My God
The commentators on UR really do suck the fun out of everything. What an embarrassment to the profession.
Great work Daniel Bar. Lovely stuff.
Nairn's Bairn
#9 Posted by Nairn's Bairn on 6 May 2020 at 08:31 AM
@#5 It's only the wall on the boundary that would need to have fire-rated windows - the side elevations are fine.
Heat loss would have been my concern here but presumably a trade-off was had with low U-value windows and beefed up insulation elsewhere.

The contrast between dark corridor and bright room is interesting.
Nairn's Bairn
#10 Posted by Nairn's Bairn on 6 May 2020 at 09:10 AM
@#3 Something for Pseud's Corner indeed.

(architect) Bar wrote: "Upon entry, the angled wall following the set out of the site boundary line widens the perspective towards the main view. This emphasis in the orientation of the otherwise equally treated openings is further underlined by the direction of the laying pattern of the oak herringbone floor. An extension, by nature, will always be treated as a newcomer within the well established built context of this area. This project focuses on the intersection of being part of a place and creating its own environment at the same time."

Eh? Apart from saying ‘we took it right to the boundary, and the floor follows the wall’ this is meaningless gobbledegook, and at odds with the simplicity of the actual building.

Why do agents insist on this sort of nonsense? We’re taught that clarity is important in drawings – its time this was extended to accompanying text. This is gibberish, and giving Planning Officers the boke does not help an application.

Common sense
#11 Posted by Common sense on 6 May 2020 at 18:50 PM
#8 yeah you stick to being a happy clapper. We'll stick with questioning the form, function....doing our jobs!
Inahuf
#12 Posted by Inahuf on 7 May 2020 at 05:17 AM
@8, the reputation of the profession is dented more by pretentious blcks and producing spaces that may look great but you find you can’t live in. Commodity, firmness AND delight; substance AND style. It’s a home not a coffee table book.

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