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Serviced apartments sought for site of ‘unviable’ Glasgow townhouse

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February 1 2018

Serviced apartments sought for site of ‘unviable’ Glasgow townhouse
An historic townhouse at the corner of Glasgow’s West Regent and West Campbell Street is in line for demolition following the submission of plans by Ark Architecture + Design and Suite Street to build serviced apartments on the plot.

A structural survey commissioned by the applicant found that the building would be difficult to repair from an economic standpoint with health and safety implications for any workers on-site, necessitating as it would near complete demolition and reconstruction.

Instead it is proposed to demolish the structure and replace it with a contemporary new build design comprising 50 serviced apartments as well as an element of retail and commercial space.

Ark wrote: “Overhangs have been introduced to add interest and a sense of depth to what are fairly simple and structured elevations intended to sit comfortably within their context. The overhangs are emphasised by subtle changes in the tone of their stonework helping to clearly define their different masses and the planes in which they sit adding architectural interest to what is a prominent corner site within the urban block.”

Formed predominantly from blonde natural stone the property will sit on a granite basecourse to ‘anchor’ the development within the city centre conservation area. Upper levels by contrast would be finished in lightweight pre-finished zinc panels with a copper/bronze finish.
Expressive overhangs have been applied to add visual interest to the prominent corner junction
Expressive overhangs have been applied to add visual interest to the prominent corner junction
The B-listed townhouse was built around 1830 with later Victorian additions
The B-listed townhouse was built around 1830 with later Victorian additions

13 Comments

wtf
#1 Posted by wtf on 1 Feb 2018 at 11:50 AM
Did someone accidentally offset the sketchup model before hitting render?
RJB
#2 Posted by RJB on 1 Feb 2018 at 13:46 PM
I quite like it. However could perhaps easily become conservation area modernist polite pastiche. I think corner windows and more modelled stonework could improve it.
lt
#3 Posted by lt on 1 Feb 2018 at 15:37 PM
the "as is" photo is very far down the street - can barely make out the building being demolished, which has been allowed to fall into an absolute terrible condition - desperately needs a lick of paint. There was a great wee bike shop in the basement (and there still is a roller skate shop upstairs) but the tenant was told he was leaving a while ago cause the owners had grand plans, and true enough, here we are!
Jon
#4 Posted by Jon on 1 Feb 2018 at 16:12 PM
Not bad. Not good either. Just generic.

Shame they haven't tried to keep the three floors/windows to line through with the rest of the street. I guess the extra floor = greater profit which trumps the aesthetics...
Ghost
#5 Posted by Ghost on 2 Feb 2018 at 11:15 AM
That is fucking brutal.
Sir Ano
#6 Posted by Sir Ano on 2 Feb 2018 at 13:03 PM
Language Mate!! lets all remain adults.
E=mc2
#7 Posted by E=mc2 on 2 Feb 2018 at 17:52 PM
A modestly scaled addition to the streetscape....not!!

And look, we can hardly see that bland gable either
Larkfield wanderer
#8 Posted by Larkfield wanderer on 2 Feb 2018 at 19:54 PM
I don't mind it, as it demonstrates glasgows edgy design credentials. Imagine that scheme in edinburgh - nae chance.
Sven
#9 Posted by Sven on 3 Feb 2018 at 13:01 PM
Would Edinburgh allow any its New Town buildings to be demolished and replaced with some rusty non-architecture solely being built to maximise profit? No, so why is Glasgow allowing what is left of its Georgian New Town? I took the time to look at the existing building and the ashlar is coming away in places (where someone tried to paint it). The building looks sound and the sandstone can be repaired or replaced. The problem is the greedy owners and not the building.
Terra
#10 Posted by Terra on 4 Feb 2018 at 00:53 AM
Agree with Sven.
Ken Cairnduff
#11 Posted by Ken Cairnduff on 4 Feb 2018 at 11:34 AM
To knock down an 180 year old building in a complete terrace is bordering on criminal.
Let's not be Luddites, but c'mon!
Christopher Dinnis
#12 Posted by Christopher Dinnis on 6 Feb 2018 at 11:59 AM
An opportunity to restore a fine building should never be missed. The proposed horror is beyond believe?? Please use some intelligence on this project and not bend to the profiteers and greed. It can be done plenty of good examples in Edinburgh.
Arthur Brown
#13 Posted by Arthur Brown on 9 Feb 2018 at 12:55 PM
I agree with the comments from Sven and others supporting the restoration of the existing rather than the "out of scale" and downright ugly proposal.

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