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Alan Dunlop reveals plans for home studio pool

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July 8 2015

Alan Dunlop reveals plans for home studio pool
Architect Alan Dunlop has revealed plans for a covered pool beside his home studio ahead of a formal planning application expected over the next few months.

In a series of trademark sketches Dunlop illustrates how the sloping topography of an existing garden will be harnessed to allow a pool house to be built with southerly aspect across surrounding woodland and open water.

In a statement Dunlop said: “The materials are to match those of the existing house and studio, white render, hardwood screens and roofing lead or zinc over the pool. We decided that instead of spending significant amounts going overseas each year for our holiday and now with increasing safety concerns we build our own pool.

“We're fortunate enough to live in a spectacular bit of Scotland.”

Contractors are presently being sought for the scheme which would connect directly to the family home.
Folding doors will open the pool out to the garden, climate permitting
Folding doors will open the pool out to the garden, climate permitting
The pool annexe is positioned to maintain views from Dunlop's existing studio
The pool annexe is positioned to maintain views from Dunlop's existing studio

13 Comments

james
#1 Posted by james on 8 Jul 2015 at 11:48 AM
I have no interest in his swimming pool, but I wish him well with it.

However, I do wish the professor would embrace change and extend himself and learn how to draw and explore the language of the art form rather than continually producing this dead kind of sketch drawing, which for some odd reason is always lauded among the architectural community as being the dogs bollocks, whereas its simply awful. I just think its a rotten example paraded before others as if this is what they should be aiming to be able to achieve!

There is no hierarchical mark making here. I am looking at no more than a sterile graphic representation of what appears to be the artifice of an ego-infatuated architecture.

It is interesting to note that the very organic full-blooded vibrant contextual element that gives any life to his straight lined composition are the TREES and yet they only merit an outline in that god-awful pen of his. His ego is more than the trees.

Get a 6B pencil man, and start drawing sensitively and editing as you go and see where that takes you!

There, maybe that might light a fuse!
Alan Dunlop
#2 Posted by Alan Dunlop on 8 Jul 2015 at 14:05 PM
So very true.
“I am looking at no more than a sterile graphic representation of what appears to be the artifice of an ego-infatuated architecture.”
Michael Grant
#3 Posted by Michael Grant on 8 Jul 2015 at 15:27 PM
# and much more than the trees. ...... more than all the birds and the bees and all the flowers of the forest. Nice work Al, all the same.
Roddy
#4 Posted by Roddy on 8 Jul 2015 at 15:53 PM
What next a porch extension ?
captaindarling
#5 Posted by captaindarling on 8 Jul 2015 at 19:39 PM
People on here make me despair. The reason we see the same names commenting all the time is that the negative smart-arse brigade put other people off. This includes people submitting their work, in addition to other commenters.

Go and do something yourself. Criticising is easy.
Linda Evans
#6 Posted by Linda Evans on 9 Jul 2015 at 08:47 AM
Perhaps the vitriol is rife because this is not a site for informing the architectural community that you will soon be running around your garden in your speedos. Eww.
'You' being a certain someone who would not hesitate to criticise others efforts.
Now....meanwhile in the real world...
Neil C
#7 Posted by Neil C on 9 Jul 2015 at 09:37 AM
I'd like to see a good porch extension. #1 you need to find something to do with your time. I'm not a doctor but try stepping away from the keyboard for a day or so, go for a walk it'll help.
Cicero
#8 Posted by Cicero on 9 Jul 2015 at 10:02 AM
True. Dunlop's ego is boundless. What next are we going to get, a garage for his porche?
Stephen
#9 Posted by Stephen on 9 Jul 2015 at 10:28 AM
I like these drawings and Alan Dunlop's drawings in general, and think the scheme is easily legible from them. There are very particular advantages to drawing by hand. Taking time over a drawing is a very different process to generating a render from a model and shouldn't be dismissed.
The project (and sprawling bungalow!) looks a little passé though. Not exactly a vernacular design. Unless AD lives in the Mid-West. In 1920.
Neil C
#10 Posted by Neil C on 9 Jul 2015 at 11:29 AM
#10 agreed easily legible you probably could build it from the main the sketch alone
shabbadoo
#11 Posted by shabbadoo on 9 Jul 2015 at 14:46 PM
Wow nice sketchup model!
Nairn's Bairn
#12 Posted by Nairn's Bairn on 9 Jul 2015 at 22:54 PM
Beautiful drawings as always from AD. Drawing by hand is a dying-out skill, and is worthwhile not just because of the great visuals. Drawing this way makes you think closely about every aspect of a project - it's so easy to conjure up a Sketch-up model without any thought. CAD and BIM are my mediums and invaluable, but drawing by hand requires a certain contemplation and intimacy with a building. It still surprises and disappoints me how few architecture graduates can write legibly, let alone draw. Is our role not all about clear graphic communication after all? Frank Ching's name is all but forgotten these days.
A Local Pleb
#13 Posted by A Local Pleb on 10 Jul 2015 at 14:30 PM
I like the drawings, it shows an attention to detail and a tangible sense of scale sadly lacking in many other projects featured!

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