Newsletter - Links - Advertise - Contact Us - Cookies
 

Architects say thanks a million as St Bride’s grant brings tower rebuild closer

Bookmark and Share | Send to friend

October 15 2014

Architects say thanks a million as St Bride’s grant brings tower rebuild closer
An endangered modernist church in East Kilbride has been handed a lifeline after waste management firm Viridor stumped up £1m to help finance the restoration and refurbishment of Gillespie, Kidd and Coia’s St. Bride’s Church.

A phased programme of works is planned by Stallan-Brand for the exposed building, with priority being given to the main church envelope which has suffered from water ingress over the years. The much needed cash will be ploughed into a restoration of the roof and walls of the A listed brick block, hailed as one of Britain’s best modern churches, which still remains in daily use.

Later phases will concentrate on upgrading building services and an ancillary Presbytery + Church House, together with improvements to the external environment. Ultimately it is hoped to restore the original composition of the structure by rebuilding a feature bell tower which was sadly demolished in 1983. Fundraising to that end is still ongoing following the sad passing of its chief architect, Professor Andy McMillan, with well-wishers being urged to donate to the fund.

Stallan-Brand design director Paul Stallan commented: "St.Brides for me is the most important modernist buildings of the period. The church made from Victorian sewer bricks and concrete is both simple and complex. The architecture continues to be a key reference for students of architecture from across the world interested in modernism and the contemporary vernacular in context. Andy and Isi's work is as important to Scotland as Alvar Aalto's work is to the Finnish."

Images courtesy of GSA
In its heyday St Bride's was seen as the jewel in the crown of East Kilbride
In its heyday St Bride's was seen as the jewel in the crown of East Kilbride
Time and the elements have been far kinder to St Bride's sister church, St.Peter's in Kilsyth
Time and the elements have been far kinder to St Bride's sister church, St.Peter's in Kilsyth

1 Comment

Andrew McIntyre
#1 Posted by Andrew McIntyre on 7 Jan 2017 at 18:42 PM
I understand that substandard mortar played the greatest part in instabilty of the initial (i.e. Prior to recent refurbishment) brickwork. My current concerns, regard a possible replacement bell-tower. I remain open to a likelihood that even the most well executed handiwork by bricklayers may still potentially
pose a maintainance liability at a later date. Thus a disincentive to rebuild the said structure may abound. However, as Glasgow's Buchanan Galleries was being constructed, I was impressed at how concrete structures could be clad in artificial brickwork. I hope and trust that this alternative construction technique be an accepted method in replicating listed structures, or at least for dispensation to be granted by planning bosses. I welcome your taking of a few moments of your time and was also encouraged to 'stumble over' online coverage discussing the funding of completing the church's layout.
MR ANDY MCINTYRE

Now 16years resident in Denny, Falkirk, I lived a total of 32years in EK and still periodically drive First's no' 6 bus on Whitemoss Avenue.

Post your comments

 

All comments are pre-moderated and
must obey our house rules.

 

Back to October 2014

Search News
Subscribe to Urban Realm Magazine
Features & Reports
For more information from the industry visit our Features & Reports section.