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Dandara press ahead with Aberdeen’s Triple Kirks development

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September 6 2013

Dandara press ahead with Aberdeen’s Triple Kirks development
Developer Dandara has announced it is to push ahead with plans first drawn up by Stewart Milne and Halliday Fraser Munro back in 2011 to build a 72,600sq/ft office block around the A listed Triple Kirks before the year is out.

The Point will occupy the footprint of the former North Kirk and will revitalise the ailing structure which has lain derelict since the 1970’s.

Deputy leader Marie Boulton added: "This is wonderful news. The Triple Kirks was designed by Archibald Simpson and is a shining example o2f some of Aberdeen's finest architecture. The re-development of this historic landmark is something citizens have wanted to see for many years and I am delighted Dandara plan to start work so quickly.

"It is fantastic to see so many wonderful plans for the city centre and this, combined with the redevelopment of the St Nicholas House site, will go a long way towards revitalising the city centre."

Gavin Wyley, managing director of Dandara in Aberdeen, said: "This is another significant step forward for the regeneration of Aberdeen city centre as a prime place to do business, and we are proud to have acquired one of the city's true architectural jewels.

"We plan to begin development very soon and are in a position to move forward quickly thanks to planning permission having already been granted by Aberdeen City Council."
Critics have claimed the new build is disrespectful to the historic church
Critics have claimed the new build is disrespectful to the historic church
The Point is the latest in a spate of office blocks to emerge from stasis
The Point is the latest in a spate of office blocks to emerge from stasis

5 Comments

Egbert
#1 Posted by Egbert on 11 Sep 2013 at 10:29 AM
I'd say the proposals were not so much disrespectful as outright insulting - the visualisations don't even bother trying to hide how the new-build block basically obliterates the church. Surely questions need to be asked about HFM's dominance of the Aberdeen market given their utterly mediocre output.
Jim
#2 Posted by Jim on 11 Sep 2013 at 12:36 PM
Spot on Egbert, I've long held the view that Aberdeen is a closed shop in terms of architecture. The continually woeful Halliday Fraser Munro obviously have a very cosy relationship with the right people in Aberdeen, as, despite producing zero work of any architectural merit, they hoover up all large projects in the area. Aberdeen as a city looks set to be deprived of yet another opportunity to create a meaningful piece of architecture in the centre. A horrific desecration of a site that holds so much potential in helping to revitalise the city centre.

If Dandara had any sense whatsoever, they would have opened this site up to proposals from new architects, rather than stick with a practice devoid of creativity.

The city, and this site in particular, deserves much better than this.
wonky
#3 Posted by wonky on 11 Sep 2013 at 16:06 PM
"Triple Kirks... is a shining example of some of Aberdeen's finest architecture" and so this development completely enmeshes it in a pedestrian shroud of glass- the steeple can only be viewed from a narrow and specialized angle. Yet remission is assured as they used granite.
Fitz Hat
#4 Posted by Fitz Hat on 4 Oct 2013 at 09:06 AM
"I've long held the view that Aberdeen is a closed shop in terms of architecture." Maybe HFM win work in Aberdeen because they have an office there. Just a thought.....
baldy
#5 Posted by baldy on 18 Feb 2014 at 14:57 PM
After 20 years working with a leading manufacturer I have long thought HFM delivered unimaginative buildings and not just only on the exterior. My domain is workplace interiors and I have been into many of their 'creations' and been left totally uninspired by the space planning and fit out where they have been involved. I have felt like this over a long period of time and I am left wondering if they just 'cut and paste' NBS specifications from one job to another without exploring the market for new and innovative materials. We all see trends change regularly (and come around again!) and HFM projects churn out the same style/finishes time after time. I can only imagine their own workplace is uninspiring to work and creativity would be something to be frowned upon.

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