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Tenants given the lowdown on £54m Wyndford estate renewal

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November 25 2021

Tenants given the lowdown on £54m Wyndford estate renewal

Tenants of four multi-storey blocks at 120, 151, 171 and 191 Wyndford Road have been informed by the GHA of plans to demolish the four towers as part of a £54m regeneration initiative.

The social landlord is inviting tenants of the Wyndford estate in Maryhill to have their say on the plans during an eight-week consultation as part of efforts to deliver hundreds of new energy-efficient homes.

Low occupancy rates and high turnover have prompted the push for more modern accommodation with residents offered alternative accommodation or priority to move into one of the new homes by GHA parent the Wheatley Group.

In a letter to residents, the GHA wrote: "Built between 1965 and 1969, the structure of these blocks makes it very difficult, if not impossible, to make them energy efficient.

"The proposal is to build in their place new, attractive, modern, fuel-efficient homes."

A five-year investment plan for the broader estate calls for the creation of a new 24-hour concierge station, CCTV, lighting and video entry systems as well as community allotments and internal security doors.

A community artwork recalling the area's history as a former army barracks is also planned, as are electric car charging points and bike stores.

Cube Housing Association have invested heavily in low-rise homes in the area
Cube Housing Association have invested heavily in low-rise homes in the area
Hundreds of low-rise homes are planned to replace lost accommodation
Hundreds of low-rise homes are planned to replace lost accommodation

8 Comments

Ian Duerr
#1 Posted by Ian Duerr on 25 Nov 2021 at 17:13 PM
In the context of cop26 there is surely an urgent need to enact legislation that would require a sustainability assessment before demolition of a dwelling is to take place. It may be the case here that the flats expensive to fix, but it is surely not impossible to reconfigure them to meet modern needs, certainly for less than £54,000,000. More likely, the housing association is keen to develop some shiny new units, regardless of the embodied carbon involved.
High tower
#2 Posted by High tower on 25 Nov 2021 at 23:57 PM
I live here, there are 624 flats (6 flats to a landing 26 stories x 4 blocks). There is a problem in winter with heating the flats but it is not the construction which is solid, it is the living room windows, where it is difficult stopping your heating blowing out the front door. If they are building eco houses on the cleared site, the pitches and perhaps part of the hub site you could maybe squeeze in 250 units(?) at best. All the years I`ve lived here my landing has been full. I think the "low occupancy" is down to the bed sit flats (corner flats are 1bedroom - middle 2 flats on a landing are bedsits). This could be sorted by joining bedsits over 2 floors to make a much larger upstairs/downstairs flat (you could make 26 in a block 104 over the 4 blocks).These would be much larger easily let flats than the bedsits which are cr*p. The flats did have a bit of a reputation but over the years it has calmed down a lot. I don`t want £900,000 spent on YET more cctv, the area is FULL of the things. The problem is of the outside reputation of the area, which is not justified and more cctv makes the place look more intimidating than it actually is. If people want to keep the density of population in the area. 1. fix the living room windows. 2. Get rid of the bedsits by joining them over two floors to make much larger flats. 3. Brighten the area up get rid of some of the cctv and promote the area positively. The west end, botanic gardens, the canals, byers rd and Maryhill sports centre are all 5-10 min walk away. I don`t know if this would be more than the £54,000,000 cost of pulling them down and building far fewer houses on the cleared site but over the years this has been a good secure home for me and I would be sad to see them go. I think the majority of residents will take the relocation money and promise of a shiny new home though.
Bill S
#3 Posted by Bill S on 26 Nov 2021 at 09:42 AM
#2 - probably the best response I have seen written on this forum in a long while. You, as a resident, have a much better understanding of place than the rest of us outside commentators.

I think your creative thinking is exactly what is needed - Collective Architecture did an excellent upgrade of Woodside high rises recently so why cannot we use their scheme as a precedent for these blocks? It seems a no brainer, especially in light of Glasgow hosting COP 26. Improve thermal performance, improve air tightness, improve the layouts of the flatted apartments and improve the resident's quality of life, all the while retaining the existing buildings. If the structure of the blocks is sound, then the question comes down to having a competent designer on board. As has been proven by Collective at Woodside, improvements can be made.

https://www.collectivearchitecture.com/projects/woodside-multi-storey-flats
Georwell 84
#4 Posted by Georwell 84 on 26 Nov 2021 at 09:51 AM
Agree with the comments on density. This is North West End with great amenities. Either upgrade the blocks or go for 'New Gorbals' tenements.
Fat Bloke on Tour
#5 Posted by Fat Bloke on Tour on 26 Nov 2021 at 10:09 AM
HT @ 23.57

Interesting counterpoint offering a low cost alternative to the current trend of HAs on an ego trip spending Holyrood donations on ever bigger / grander schemes that scream trendy wendy / of the moment design vibe.

Could this be social housing's "Stonehouse" moment?

Has no-one thought about the opportunity cost of tearing down and building back up?

Are we now playing games around the VAT rules?
KMCA
#6 Posted by KMCA on 26 Nov 2021 at 10:12 AM
Sketch of low rise housing looks awfully familiar. Fine to use other developments as design inspiration, but this is an obvious trace-over of Abode by Proctor Matthews. I wish them the best of luck if they're appointed for this redevelopment, and the best of luck in their copyright infringement case if not.

https://www.proctorandmatthews.com/case-study/abode-great-kneighton
MV
#7 Posted by MV on 26 Nov 2021 at 15:29 PM
I have to agree with #3. #2 makes the most sensible, positive and well thought through comment of the year for sure. You have convinced me of your alternate approach!
Daniel
#8 Posted by Daniel on 29 Nov 2021 at 09:58 AM
Some really good comments here so far, especially (and obviously) #2.

Also seems like an absolute waste to use a site this well connected for a suburban housing estate. As the long-term steward of the area the HA really should be thinking bigger and better - why not retain+refurb the towers AND redevelop the land around them?

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