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Longniddry housing development goes back to the future

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October 14 2020

Longniddry housing development goes back to the future

Cruden Homes has launched a Knockroon-inspired traditionally-styled housing development at Longniddry, East Lothian, which delivers a variety of properties reminiscent of the Georgian and Victorian era.

Adhering to principles set out by the Princes Foundation house styles include a mix of coach houses, bungalows and villas with garages and parking spaces positioned out of sight along rear access lanes.

Intended to evoke an archetypical East Lothian burgh and village the development will offer residents a range of amenities including a primary school, restored mill pond, community orchard and a wildflower meadow. A new village green will also be created with bird and bat boxes installed throughout to help establish a wildlife corridor along Braid's Burn.

Hazel Davies, sales and marketing director of Cruden Homes (East), commented: “Longniddry Village is a very special development in one of the most attractive locations and these traditionally designed and carefully crafted new homes will encapsulate classic village living beautifully."

The first homes of the 450-home masterplan, developed by Socially Conscious Capital and Taylor Architecture & Urbanism, are scheduled to complete by spring next year.

Car parking will be provided off rear access lanes to preserve a slower aesthetic
Car parking will be provided off rear access lanes to preserve a slower aesthetic
The masterplan seeks to protect the semi-rural setting of the area
The masterplan seeks to protect the semi-rural setting of the area

15 Comments

Boak McPoundbury
#1 Posted by Boak McPoundbury on 14 Oct 2020 at 11:52 AM
Aw, nice. Are they lit by candlelight too?
Robin B's Discount
#2 Posted by Robin B's Discount on 14 Oct 2020 at 13:02 PM
Where's my BSB squarial going!
RJB
#3 Posted by RJB on 14 Oct 2020 at 13:40 PM
#1 Why would they be lit by candlelight?
The Bairn
#4 Posted by The Bairn on 14 Oct 2020 at 14:53 PM
Hmm nicely presented, but in the real world will these remain untouched by value engineering and then shoddy workmanship?
So where do the plethora of multi-coloured council refuse bins go? In each garage? And how does the bin mans 'dustcart' propose to serve the residents, is there a designated service road network or purely backdoor entry/exit? Feral bins all over the country inevitable hang about far too long and become eyesores. Or am I just being too pravtical?
Boak McPoundbury
#5 Posted by Boak McPoundbury on 14 Oct 2020 at 15:02 PM
#4 crikey, you see this and are only concerned about refuse collection?
Not too bothered about the chronic mock-Georgian guff in between the bins no?
Welcome to scottish house building in 2020.
Fair Trade Charlie
#6 Posted by Fair Trade Charlie on 14 Oct 2020 at 16:18 PM
#3 It's a key component of preserving a slower aesthetic strategy
Peter North
#7 Posted by Peter North on 15 Oct 2020 at 09:35 AM
#4 Good point. You forgot the trampolines and shedload of plastic kids toys exploded around the perimeter.

On the other hand - is the garage doorstep a flood protection scheme element?
mick
#8 Posted by mick on 15 Oct 2020 at 13:20 PM
Remarkably vomit inducing in both built end product and developer nonsense statement.
getting to zero carbon
#9 Posted by getting to zero carbon on 15 Oct 2020 at 13:23 PM
As a new development, I take it that the houses will all have solar panels and ground source heat pumps, will not be on the gas main, and will have excellent insulation and double glazing. Or does the Prince's Trust commitment to the environment not extend that far?
why the hate
#10 Posted by why the hate on 15 Oct 2020 at 13:53 PM
Given just how horrible your modern developer stuff is, I have to say if this stays as the images it really isn’t so bad is it? I think your all forgetting that your average developer fair is exactly this, but just done so badly you don’t consider that it is. Id never live in one if I could avoid it, but for your average non architecturally inclined person this is pretty decent id say.
Robin B's Discount
#11 Posted by Robin B's Discount on 15 Oct 2020 at 14:04 PM
@ 10: "but for your average non architecturally inclined person"

Get a grip of yourself! That kind of elitist chat deserves a public flogging! I'd love to see your idea of what architecturally inclined people live in.
why the hate
#12 Posted by why the hate on 15 Oct 2020 at 15:08 PM
Somthing that they like, perhaps not an over priced developer pastiche. ?? ????????
Inahuf
#13 Posted by Inahuf on 15 Oct 2020 at 17:34 PM
So if there’s only a sliver of ground at the front, and only parking bays at the rear, where’s all the green stuff that we know folk need for wellbeing and as climate mediation?
You’ve doubled up the hard landscaping as you’ve doubled the routes, so that’s expensive/wasteful, and at the same time taken away privacy for the homes. This to hide cars we should likely get rid of in the next decade or two. It’s not just the architecture that’s stuck in the past, it’s the whole concept.
Tara
#14 Posted by Tara on 16 Oct 2020 at 09:45 AM
i recently visited Tornagrain and I have to say I was impressed. Whether you agree with the style or not the housing and spaces created were leaps and bounds ahead of what is being done in most bog standard housing estates. I'd rather this than TW special any day. At least it relates to the place.
SHOUTING ANDREW
#15 Posted by SHOUTING ANDREW on 19 Oct 2020 at 09:16 AM
SHOUT IT - THIS IS 2020 NOT 1720.

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