Newsletter - Links - Advertise - Contact Us - Cookies
 

Keppie draw up plans for £72m East Lothian Hospital

Bookmark and Share | Send to friend

October 5 2015

Keppie draw up plans for £72m East Lothian Hospital
Keppie has submitted plans for a £72m community hospital to be built on the site of the existing Roodlands Hospital, Haddington.
The new building will re-introduce key clinical services to the local authority area and expand inpatient bed capacity by close to 60 per cent.

David Small, chief officer, East Lothian Health and Social Care Partnership, commented: “These are exciting plans which will see a modern and purpose-built hospital developed, helping improve the quality of care for people in East Lothian.
 
“Staff have formed a key role in the design layout of the new building, and have influenced the outcome of the proposed plans of their departments and location within the building.  
 
“We have also engaged extensively with over 300 local people, including neighbours close to the Roodlands site and valued their comments.”

Construction is expected to get underway late next year subject to planning approval with phase one works completing by December 2017.
An outline business case will set out the precise costs, services and timescales of the hospital early next year
An outline business case will set out the precise costs, services and timescales of the hospital early next year

2 Comments

Dr. Kildare
#1 Posted by Dr. Kildare on 6 Oct 2015 at 09:36 AM
Q. Do architects firms design buildings for others in their own image?

Where is the expression of the plurality of a community? Where is the expression of the many differing functions within the building?

In order to anaesthetise the building users from this monolith/airport/shopping mall, if you look closely enough you can see they are all heavily medicated.

They have to be.
Robert
#2 Posted by Robert on 6 Oct 2015 at 15:10 PM
#1. East Lothian doesn't have a lot of 'community plurality' (for the record I live there) and even if it did, I'm not sure if this can or should be brought into play in hospital architecture. As for expressing the differing functions within the building, it isn't the 80s anymore and this is a hospital.

Slightly harsh to blame the architects for the perceived failures - this is obviously a very cheap and simple building that they have at least attempted to compose with care. Unfortunately this is not a sector that is particularly conducive to creating good architecture these days.

Post your comments

 

All comments are pre-moderated and
must obey our house rules.

 

Back to October 2015

Search News
Subscribe to Urban Realm Magazine
Features & Reports
For more information from the industry visit our Features & Reports section.