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St Vincent Plaza to commence on-site within ‘days’

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April 29 2013

St Vincent Plaza to commence on-site within ‘days’
Abstract, developer behind a speculative 170,000sq/ft office development at 303 St Vincent Street, Glasgow, has announced that construction will commence ‘in a matter of days’ following a delay in acquiring the site.

This has seen Bowmer & Kirkland appointed to deliver the project on a fixed price contract at the bottom of the market cycle to maximise returns and Turner & Townsend tasked with project management.

Designed by Keppie St Vincent Plaza will will see ten floors of virtually column free floor space rising to a feature ‘penthouse’ office level which will sport dramatic views of the city skyline.

Abstract chief executive Mark Glatman said: “We are delighted to confirm our move to start construction. We have been working hard over recent months to finalise various complex agreements to enable this work to commence and we are very pleased to be able to now move forward without any further delay.”

Turner & Townsend Glasgow director, Andy Outram, added: “As one of the first truly speculative office developments for a number of years, St Vincent Plaza represents a fantastic opportunity for Glasgow’s regeneration, not to mention a return to health for the city’s commercial construction industry which has struggled in the current climate.
 St Vincent Plaza will have an end value of £65m when it completes in early 2015, directly opposite Page/Park’s planned Scottish Power HQ.
St Vincent Plaza will have an end value of £65m when it completes in early 2015, directly opposite Page/Park’s planned Scottish Power HQ.
 The scheme is intended to undercut rivals in the Grade A office rental market through delivery of a cost effective block on a prominent plot, whilst achieving a BREEAM ‘Excellent’ standard and EPC ‘B’ rating.
The scheme is intended to undercut rivals in the Grade A office rental market through delivery of a cost effective block on a prominent plot, whilst achieving a BREEAM ‘Excellent’ standard and EPC ‘B’ rating.

11 Comments

BOAB
#1 Posted by BOAB on 29 Apr 2013 at 12:13 PM
Great to see this project moving
i think it looks good and will be a welcolme addition to the Glasgow skyline
HELP MA BOAB
#2 Posted by HELP MA BOAB on 29 Apr 2013 at 12:47 PM
or a vegetable soup of a building, more like.
Ross
#3 Posted by Ross on 29 Apr 2013 at 12:55 PM
It is a nice building, but Glasgow could be doing with another prominent, striking building to create a dramatic skyline.
Egbert
#4 Posted by Egbert on 29 Apr 2013 at 15:35 PM
It's a bit of a generic noughties office-block-by-numbers (and, we might hope, one of the last recorded instances of the oh-so-2002 barcode facade trend) but any move to reinforce and re-urbanise this ragged edge of the city grid is to be welcomed.
Rob
#5 Posted by Rob on 29 Apr 2013 at 20:08 PM
Good Looking Building
Well done Keppie
Big Chantelle
#6 Posted by Big Chantelle on 30 Apr 2013 at 12:22 PM
Do.Not.Like.

Why is there this insistence on using multiple materials and random cladding thus creating a dog's dinner of a building. It looks dated before it's even built.

But hey, this is modernism. Thanks Corbusier!
NIMBYism: Just Say No!
#7 Posted by NIMBYism: Just Say No! on 30 Apr 2013 at 12:31 PM
What! Corb would be spinning if he was linked to this. Nothing either to do with modernism, instead lack of discipline, experience and, frankly, talent.
#5 In comparison with a gap site that has sat empty for 25 years and Scottish Power proposal across the road it does look pretty damn good. Agreed.
Brian
#8 Posted by Brian on 30 Apr 2013 at 15:39 PM
I agree,It looks bland and just like the one that will be built opposite by Scottish power,and not much different from the building going up in george st at moment.
Ghost of Corbusier
#9 Posted by Ghost of Corbusier on 30 Apr 2013 at 16:53 PM
No worries Big Chantelle you trumpet.
Stephen
#10 Posted by Stephen on 30 Apr 2013 at 17:55 PM
Usual bobbins from so-called architects giving the minority who are actually any good a bad name. Apparently all you need to learn to be an architect is how to arbitrarily mash together a few elevations in the vague style of the zeitgeist and if you happen to think it 'looks nice', you've done your job. Absolute c**p. What is then the difference between you then and a good technologist? Probably only that they can make sure it doesn't leek. Architects are only proving that they aren't required with this sort of rubbish and the profession will die (it's already happening).
David
#11 Posted by David on 1 May 2013 at 09:43 AM
Fairly typical Keppie bashing. It's certainly far from being a masterpiece but it's not the devastatingly bad building some of you are making out. But hey, it's all about positive criticism isn't it?...ie let's actually have some proper critique of designs instead of just saying 'lack of discipline, experience and, frankly, talent'.

What does a Welsh vegetable have to do with it anyway Stephen. or do you mean leak?

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