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Dunlop sketches out core design principles in education

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April 26 2012

Dunlop sketches out core design principles in education
Alan Dunlop has published a series of sketches which aim to visualise the core design qualities for which Scottish schools are currently striving.

These serve as an introduction to the Family of Schools exhibition currently running in the Lighthouse, which will explore a range of issues impacting on learning spaces.

This draws on a number of recent examples of school building across the country such as James Gillespie’s in Edinburgh and Campbeltown Grammar

Speaking about the exhibition Sam Cassels, the Head of the Schools Programme at Architecture and Design Scotland, said: “Well designed learning places are first and foremost places which people want to be in. The aim of school design is straightforward: to create places where remarkable things can happen every day.  This demands the relentless pursuit of better ways for design to enable learning.”
An enlivened roofscape and generous circulation spaces feature prominently
An enlivened roofscape and generous circulation spaces feature prominently
Both urban and rural school designs have been considered
Both urban and rural school designs have been considered

13 Comments

Human Resources
#1 Posted by Human Resources on 27 Apr 2012 at 11:50 AM
Does anyone have the capacity to convert these to 3D models so they convey the idea in a clearer manner?

Cheers,

HR
JD
#2 Posted by JD on 27 Apr 2012 at 12:18 PM
My advice is to get your intern to do them them on SketchUp it's faster, clearer and cheaper.
Phylis Stein
#3 Posted by Phylis Stein on 28 Apr 2012 at 11:21 AM
Get them done in Romania HR and cut out the intern.
Kevan Shaw
#4 Posted by Kevan Shaw on 30 Apr 2012 at 12:28 PM
It is a real concern that people working in the visual design medium cannot read and understand simple and elegant sketches like these. Are people now lacking any ability for their imagination to fill these out and visualise how these spaces would be in reality?

It is bad enough that the core skills of sketching are no longer practiced or taught, the inability to read anything but a 3d computer model is really troubling.

Kevan Shaw
Phil E. Stein
#5 Posted by Phil E. Stein on 30 Apr 2012 at 14:42 PM
Cool it, Kevan. What I think my less eloquent colleagues (including my idiot daughter Phylis at #3 above) are trying to say is that these types of admirable drafting skills are less relevant to modern practice. Of course the ability to allow the the initial design idea to spill onto paper for the first time with a decent sketch is essential, whether in front of a client in a brainstorm or in the office, the need to prepare such elaborate and detailed drawings as the ones above has been largely superseded by technology. There is less call for intricate wood or stome carving skills in moder architecture than there was 150 years ago, but are our contemporary buildings any worse for that? While it is a pity when any traditional skills are lost, we need to embrace technology and cultural advances, and we are not necessarily any worse off as a result. It is wrong to suggest that computer generated images are the dumb cousins of very skillful (and time consuming therefore expensive) hand drawings. It is possible to express an element of the self through simple cad drawings, never mind more elaborate rendered images. Anyway, must dash - the nib on my bloody Rotring 0.13 has blocked again...
Phylis Stein
#6 Posted by Phylis Stein on 30 Apr 2012 at 15:02 PM
= This comment has been removed for contravening Urban Realm's terms & conditions =
JD
#7 Posted by JD on 30 Apr 2012 at 15:13 PM
Indeed, cool it Kev. Dunlop's ploughing his own furrow again. We are not interested. It's difficult enough in practice at the moment without a return to drawing. Architects can no longer afford it when fees are cut to the bone. Clients are not interested either in drawing they want quick cad images and lots of them. You can get them done inexpensively through varois sources.
Stewart
#8 Posted by Stewart on 30 Apr 2012 at 21:31 PM
I'm with Kev on this. Your sarcastic comments are laughable people. It's difficult to work out what you hate most. The idea of drawing? If you don't like drawing what on earth led you to consider a career in architecture? The idea of Alan Dunlop drawing? or is it just the idea of Alan Dunlop himself?

Lots of our clients like drawings like these sketches. They display a human touch sadly lacking in most cad images. The idea that architect's can "no longer afford to draw" is particularly sad. The drawn exploration of ideas is surely what sets us apart as a profession and should be a unique selling point.
Bob
#9 Posted by Bob on 1 May 2012 at 20:42 PM
I am running three primary school projects at the moment and barely have time to visit the wc never mind draw. Drawings are fine in their place on a wall or in a gallery what is needed is standardisation of details, plans and all school components NOT ARTY ARCHITECTS
dirige
#10 Posted by dirige on 1 May 2012 at 21:05 PM
interesting roofscape obvious care taken
Bob
#11 Posted by Bob on 1 May 2012 at 21:56 PM
Exactly, pretentious twaddle a roof is a roof to keep the rain out
Bob
#12 Posted by Bob on 1 May 2012 at 21:56 PM
Exactly, pretentious twaddle a roof is a roof to keep the rain out
dirige
#13 Posted by dirige on 1 May 2012 at 23:22 PM
Well, I would actually disagree but found the annotation to be a touch humerous nonetheless.

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