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Architect salaries rise 14 per cent as confidence returns

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November 21 2014

Architect salaries rise 14 per cent as confidence returns
Salaries in the Scottish construction sector are bucking a wider stagnation in incomes to post inflation busting increases across the board thanks to renewed confidence within the industry, according to recruitment agency Hays.

It reports that architects have seen their salaries rise by 14 per cent over the past year with contract managers, project managers, quantity surveyors, site managers and engineers also seeing rises of between 10 and 20 per cent.

These are some of the largest salary increases in the UK and easily outstrip the average 2 per cent rise in wages seen across the country as a whole, a trend which looks set to continue with 77 per cent of construction employers looking to increase headcounts next year.

Claire Sheerin, director of Hays construction & property in Scotland, said: “We’ve seen a gradual increase in construction salaries in Scotland for some time now, but these pockets of salary rises are becoming more significant. Jobseekers often have the pick of two or three jobs, they get snapped up quickly by employers and they often receive a counter offer from their current employer, which can push their salary up even further.
 
“Some employees have already spotted they can earn more and decided to make a career move. Others will follow suit over the next 12 months and the situation could soon reach crisis point for employers fighting for the talent they need. With construction employees reporting high levels of dissatisfaction with pay, employers will need to look at what they can offer in order to attract and retain the best employees.”

Hays base their findings on a survey of 10,000 employers and employees.

8 Comments

Bridgette
#1 Posted by Bridgette on 21 Nov 2014 at 11:35 AM
There certainly rising a lot faster than the Scottish Power Site on the left of the picture
Bob
#2 Posted by Bob on 21 Nov 2014 at 12:07 PM
Reap the decent salaries while you can before Cameron and Co balls it all up again. I give it 18 months and we will be back to 2008 scenario...
Britdgette
#3 Posted by Britdgette on 21 Nov 2014 at 12:38 PM
I for one would take the 2008 scenario over the salmond financial doomsday scenario
common sense
#4 Posted by common sense on 21 Nov 2014 at 13:33 PM
#3 Britdgette,

well looks like the no'ers will get what they want and the next GE. ukip tory coalition.
CADMonkey
#5 Posted by CADMonkey on 21 Nov 2014 at 14:25 PM
Well that is a democracy for you. A United Kingdom with the government the majority of people in the UK want. Cool. Not the panderings of a nationalist minority foisted upon us.
David Wilson
#6 Posted by David Wilson on 21 Nov 2014 at 14:54 PM
*5 - 'A United Kingdom with the government the majority of people in the UK want.'

Arithmetic not your strong point.

On a 65% turnout Cameron gained 36% of the vote which equates to 10m people. The UK voting population is @ 46m-50m depending on how many are on the electoral register each given year.

Anyway, keeping on topic, good to see at least one professional sector keeping pay rises decent - long may it continue.
CADMonkey
#7 Posted by CADMonkey on 21 Nov 2014 at 15:17 PM
Mr Wilson, I think you are being a tad pedantic there. The Conservatives got loads loads more votes than anyone else. But they didn't just declare power, no they are sharing power with the Liberal Democrats. How much more democratic can you get?
Based on the last General Election results who do you think should be in power?
By the way I think I do need to point out that "The Government" is not just "Cameron".
Anon
#8 Posted by Anon on 24 Nov 2014 at 08:59 AM
Trust urban realm readers to even find away to grumble about wage rises, you guys never let me down!

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