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Macallan uncork £140m Rogers designed temple to whisky

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May 22 2018

Macallan uncork £140m Rogers designed temple to whisky
Edrington-owned whisky brand The Macallan have taken possession of a £140m temple to Scotch whisky following completion of its camouflaged Speyside HQ by Robertson Construction.

Located just 500m away from its historic home the state of the art distillery sits within the Easter Elchies estate near Craigellachie in Moray, resting beneath a gently undulating turf roof to help blend with the rolling countryside.

The expansive roof stretches to 14,000sq/m in total and includes a wildflower meadow to disguise ventilation, vapour control, waterproofing and irrigation systems. Custom-built to designs by Rogers, Stirk, Harbour & Partners it includes 2,500 largely unique panels and 380,000 individual components.

Lead architect Graham Stirk said: “The Macallan estate truly is a special place; a place we have come to love and respect hugely. The vision was always ambitious but this enabled us to challenge our own thinking to create something so dramatic and awe-inspiring.”

Inspired by enigmatic broch architecture the hi-tech solution is a purposeful step into the future and a key differentiator with other distilleries, establishing itself as a key attraction in popular whisky tours when it opens its doors to the public on 2 June.
3,275 sample bottles sit within a glass display wall. Photo Mark Power
3,275 sample bottles sit within a glass display wall. Photo Mark Power
A hive of engineering lies hidden below traditional copper stills and the hi-tech roof. Photo Ian Gavan
A hive of engineering lies hidden below traditional copper stills and the hi-tech roof. Photo Ian Gavan

Five 'crests' have been seeded with a mix of indigenous grasses and wildflowes, Photo Ian Ganavan
Five 'crests' have been seeded with a mix of indigenous grasses and wildflowes, Photo Ian Ganavan
The complex build took three years and six months to deliver
The complex build took three years and six months to deliver

The subterranean giant stands 24m tall at its highest point. Photo Mark Power
The subterranean giant stands 24m tall at its highest point. Photo Mark Power
The visitor experience will open its doors on 2 June
The visitor experience will open its doors on 2 June

Viewed from afar the distillery blends with the Speyside landscape. Photo Mark Power
Viewed from afar the distillery blends with the Speyside landscape. Photo Mark Power

16 Comments

Jonathan
#1 Posted by Jonathan on 23 May 2018 at 10:02 AM
This is a real stunning building! Well done to all involved, some of the spaces and Architectural elements are superb. You do expect this for £140M (nice to have that budget on any building).
Harry
#2 Posted by Harry on 23 May 2018 at 10:16 AM
its great to see a contemporary, interesting building celebrating whisky and giving a unique visitor experience. Having recently come back from visiting some modern wineries in Italy, it does disappoint when the same old twee designs replicating "traditional" distilleries are built (pagodas, white wash walls etc). Hopefully this will encourage whisky companies to invest in modern architecture to complement their products.
boaby wan
#3 Posted by boaby wan on 23 May 2018 at 10:38 AM
The interiors of this look absolutely brilliant but I'm not a fan of the externals at all; it's an interesting approach to a huge building, trying to hide it, but the rounded "mounds" are just weird
David
#4 Posted by David on 23 May 2018 at 10:57 AM
I have to agree with Boaby Wan...having seen the proposals previously I had expected to be impressed by the roof, but it appears a bit clunky and faked. Maybe over time the landscape will soften the surface.
only members of the fabian society can comment
#5 Posted by only members of the fabian society can comment on 23 May 2018 at 11:27 AM
p'raps on 't trip up north beyond croydon, they'd seen 't five pyramids on 't M8...
David
#6 Posted by David on 23 May 2018 at 12:15 PM
...i was thinking more telly-tubbies
You cant fit quicker than a kwik fit fitter
#7 Posted by You cant fit quicker than a kwik fit fitter on 23 May 2018 at 14:29 PM
Is it just me or the photos, but the quality of finish looks decidedly poor. Can see the snagging continuing for longer than the construction period.
Alf
#8 Posted by Alf on 23 May 2018 at 15:20 PM
@ YCFQTAKFF
I think its just you.
Aberdire
#9 Posted by Aberdire on 23 May 2018 at 22:49 PM
#8 no, it is not. I concur, it looks cheap and clunky
Alf
#10 Posted by Alf on 24 May 2018 at 08:55 AM
Aberdine and YCFQTAKFF, I have been on site and can assure you it is not.
Alf
#11 Posted by Alf on 24 May 2018 at 09:40 AM
To be fair, Aberdire and ycfqtakff both have a point, there are areas where the quality could be better. I think my judgement may be clouded by my involvement in it.
alf
#12 Posted by alf on 24 May 2018 at 09:49 AM
Nice troll, good effort! I wasn't actually involved in it, simply visited site.
Sir Ano
#13 Posted by Sir Ano on 24 May 2018 at 14:22 PM
#7. Would you be able to give us some examples from you snagging list?
Young Team
#14 Posted by Young Team on 25 May 2018 at 09:43 AM
Really like this, top banana
Broch?
#15 Posted by Broch? on 25 May 2018 at 22:28 PM
Looks more like glacial moraine
Stephen
#16 Posted by Stephen on 27 May 2018 at 23:00 PM
I think this looks fantastic. The roof concept has parallels to California Academy of Sciences by Renzo Piano Building Workshop and the Park Houses scheme developed by Kathryn Findlay but other aspects look very different. Appears to me an aesthetically pleasing way to install a large and complex commercial and industrial building in a sensitive landscape. Well done!

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