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Dunfermine gallery and library space previewed ahead of Spring opening

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December 9 2016

Dunfermine gallery and library space previewed ahead of Spring opening
Dunfermline’s brand new Carnegie Library and Galleries building has been unwrapped ahead of its official opening in the spring, giving the first indication of how the dramatic cultural building marries with the world’s first Carnegie Library.

Designed by Richard Murphy Architects and and delivered by BAM Construction on behalf of Fife Council the build is currently undergoing an internal fit-out ahead of its 2017 unveil.

In a statement Fife Cultural Trust, operator of the new ceentre, said: “The new building will supersede two small and inadequately accessible museum premises, Dunfermline Museum and Pittencrie House Museum, and serve as a gateway to the town’s illustrious past, opening up a new public space between the historic buildings of the Heritage Quarter.”

Located in the heart of the ancient Royal capital’s Heritage Quarter the £12.4m complex will host a museum, three temporary exhibition galleries, café, children’s library and a local history, study and archives space geared toward drawing tourists to the area.
An interior fit-out is currently underway ahead of a spring 2017 opening
An interior fit-out is currently underway ahead of a spring 2017 opening
Teh museum and gallery space sitgs at the heart of Dunfermline's cultural quarter
Teh museum and gallery space sitgs at the heart of Dunfermline's cultural quarter

8 Comments

David
#1 Posted by David on 9 Dec 2016 at 15:25 PM
Beautiful exterior, but that interior space is shockingly bad.
Sven
#2 Posted by Sven on 11 Dec 2016 at 23:07 PM
I am very alarmed by the second image. Why so much wasted space? Surely a successful building maximises on what it is designed to do? This is style over function and I find that very hard to swallow as that is essentially unScottish.
CADMonkey
#3 Posted by CADMonkey on 13 Dec 2016 at 16:40 PM
Looks pretty good to me.
I don't see the problem with the second image. I see stairs, a corridor space and an economical atrium traversed by bridges that provides light and glimpses through the building. It will probably be quite nice.
I just hope the café has a nice view and sells cappuccino and tablet.
David
#4 Posted by David on 13 Dec 2016 at 17:32 PM
I just see an unnecessary doubling up of corridors resulting in a very narrow void, and mainly solid walls to the atrium...what exactly is behind all these solid walls?...and why are they not allowed to look in to an atrium? If you can call it that...
Cadmonkey
#5 Posted by Cadmonkey on 13 Dec 2016 at 21:43 PM
Hmmm...#3 I suppose you think Frank Lloyd Wright building a house above a waterfall was "unnecessary" too.
Come to think of it, pyramids too. I can't stand them. They are so unnecessary.
David
#6 Posted by David on 14 Dec 2016 at 12:25 PM
I just see an unnecessary doubling up of corridors resulting in a very narrow void, and mainly solid walls to the atrium...what exactly is behind all these solid walls?...and why are they not allowed to look in to an atrium? If you can call it that...
David
#7 Posted by David on 14 Dec 2016 at 12:29 PM
Don't be daft.
I'm just saying it as I see it. I'm criticising the space which, from what I can see, I feel doesn't work.
Frank Lloyd Wrong
#8 Posted by Frank Lloyd Wrong on 21 Dec 2016 at 13:50 PM
David - with respect, you're talking absolute p!sh.
Given the name, I'd imagine it's probably library or gallery accommodation behind those walls. Imagine wanting to close them off from a light noisy atrium. What were they thinking???
Just another ignorant UR Readers comment.
Hats off to RMA. Not always a fan of their larger projects but this one's a cracker!

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