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Canonmills Bridge residents fight rear guard battle against demolition

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March 2 2016

Canonmills Bridge residents fight rear guard battle against demolition
Residents of Edinburgh’s Inverleith conservation area have launched a rear guard action to save a modest unlisted building on Canonmills Bridge from demolition to make way for new flats.

A planning application by Fouin + Bell to six flats and three town houses scheme was refused in February last year but a separate application on behalf of Glovart Holdings to demolish the existing structure, initially also dismissed by planners last August, has been approved by the Scottish government reporter on appeal.

In a last ditch bid to put a spanner in the works the Save Canonmills Bridge campaign group are writing to cabinet secretary Alex Neil to reverse the decision, stating: “Why should one person from Glasgow decide that this building should be demolished against the wishes of thousands of local people and against the unanimous decision of the planning committee? Where is democracy? Why isn’t the government looking after the historic environment? Please stop this vandalism.”

Close to 200 objections were lodged to the demolition by neighbours and other interested parties warning of the loss of an important ‘visual break’ in the New Town but the reporter dismissed these concerns, stating that the existing structure was ‘atypical’ and ‘peripheral to the conservation area’.
Detractors fear that future development will dominate the Water of Leith
Detractors fear that future development will dominate the Water of Leith
Some 7,000 people have signed a petition against the demolition
Some 7,000 people have signed a petition against the demolition

2 Comments

Artisan2
#1 Posted by Artisan2 on 3 Mar 2016 at 12:54 PM
The low-lying, street-level-trading frontage-only nature of the existing building expresses a relevant spatial and historical character for Canonmills' foot-of-hill sense of place.

A would-be developer proposing that a private profit opportunity is more important than the feelings of the local community is self-interested and uncaring. Immediate profit-driven development for a few versus historical environmental value for many.

Economics again elevated to triumph over society. Why should Edinburgh tolerate such wrong-headed decisions? Any suggestions?
Mr Gouda
#2 Posted by Mr Gouda on 4 Mar 2016 at 08:32 AM
What is the minimum number of Glaswegians required in order that decisions of this nature are deemed valid? If the Glaswegian threshold has not been met then the decision may be challengeable.

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