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Ailteir-Studio deliver Bearsden home extension

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October 3 2014

Ailteir-Studio deliver Bearsden home extension
Ailteir-Studio has unveiled a ‘white cube’ home extension in Bearsden, Glasgow, designed to introduce a new open plan living/dining space.

A modernist design was specified to complement the existing house which was delivered under a traditional build contract.
Boasting high performance triple glazing with a U value of 0.6 the modernist build is designed to complement the existing house.

Project architect Matthew Merrick said: “The side boundary wall becomes the parapet wall which returns to become a flanking side wall. Large sliding folding doors open onto a newly landscaped patio with undercroft to the wide roof soffit. A large kitchen and dining area allow the family to live in a modern way which compliments the traditional spaces of the existing Victorian house.

“The corner glazed wall maximises views and light from the garden, allowing outside space to flow into the family room. Roof lights allow enjoyment of the sky even on a cloudy Scottish day.”

The extension was delivered under a traditional build contract.
An existing conservatory and utility space was demolished to make way for the extension
An existing conservatory and utility space was demolished to make way for the extension
Appropriately enough the extension is referred to as the 'White Cube'
Appropriately enough the extension is referred to as the 'White Cube'

garden views are maximised from the open plan kitchen
garden views are maximised from the open plan kitchen

12 Comments

Rabbie
#1 Posted by Rabbie on 3 Oct 2014 at 12:10 PM
Subtle...
Art Vandelay
#2 Posted by Art Vandelay on 3 Oct 2014 at 12:55 PM
I'm just glad its a modernist design in order to complement the existing house. Anything else just wouldn't have worked.
Walt Disney
#3 Posted by Walt Disney on 3 Oct 2014 at 14:07 PM
If only the architect's hadn't been so constrained by context. They could have created something really wonderful.

Seriously though, did they send the drawings to the wrong site?
Sven
#4 Posted by Sven on 3 Oct 2014 at 14:34 PM
The extension is too big for the garden. You cannot appreciate it as it is jammed up against the gabions and the remaining garden is now too small for the house size. I suppose if the garden is landscaped to fit the extension then the outlook may improve.

It looks like it is north facing (so good to have as much light into it as possible) but then why render the walls white? In the very wet Glasgow area weather it will just go green within a year even with regular maintenance.
Rem-Job
#5 Posted by Rem-Job on 3 Oct 2014 at 16:23 PM
I'd probably re-read Space, Form and Order by Ching this weekend....
Neil Stephen
#6 Posted by Neil Stephen on 6 Oct 2014 at 13:42 PM
Matthew
Good work - trying to manage client's demands, context of a previously extended house, and budget, is never easy - ignore the sarcasm of the naysayers...any internal shots?
John Glenday
#7 Posted by John Glenday on 6 Oct 2014 at 14:32 PM
I've popped an interior view up Neil
james
#8 Posted by james on 7 Oct 2014 at 13:44 PM
I can now see that two-fifths of the picture plane of the north- facing full-height glazed wall is taken up by the gabion retaining wall. Hmmmmm......Oh! Dear! Was this really thought through? Really? Walt Disney is right - it's the wrong site, tut tut.
Jonathan
#9 Posted by Jonathan on 7 Oct 2014 at 13:53 PM
Quite like glazing the retaining wall personally. Not every site can have views of lochs and mountains. I am sure there are a variety of reasons that this scheme came about, and I think the connection between the garden and extension, given the obviously tight site and difference in level, is quite effective. Perhaps could have stepped the gabion and/or had a terraced retaining wall with planting.
Jimbob Tanktop
#10 Posted by Jimbob Tanktop on 8 Oct 2014 at 01:53 AM
Is that n inflatable jacuzzi at the back of the garden? Nice...

Re: the interior shot: you would think they could at least have found somewhere to put a hook to hold the dishtowel.
Ian Nairn Jr
#11 Posted by Ian Nairn Jr on 8 Oct 2014 at 15:39 PM
Gah! What a beauty. With waist-high gabions inches from the glass and a metre overhang to the eaves, they've basically built a really expensive pillbox. Though as #6 said, maybe it’s exactly what the (I assume recently retired from the army) client wanted.
Gary Pocket
#12 Posted by Gary Pocket on 23 Oct 2014 at 17:55 PM
Matthew,
A fine and bold effort!

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