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Councilors to decide fate of Bridgend Farmhouse community centre plan

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April 24 2014

Councilors to decide fate of Bridgend Farmhouse community centre plan
Edinburgh City Council is to decide the fate of plans to refurbish a derelict farmhouse in the Craigmillar district of the city next week when they deliberate on whether to pass the site on to a group planning to turn the building into a centre for learning, eating and exercise – or sell it to the highest bidder.

Bridgend Inspiring Growth has already attracted support from the Big Lottery Fund for their plans, drawn up in collaboration with Malcolm Fraser Architects, which would see a full restoration of the farmhouse to provide flexible accommodation for social enterprises, a new courtyard, workshops and allotments.

It is intended that this space would provide base for accessing Craigmillar Park as well as offering a range of services for those with learning disabilities or mental health issues as well as those who harbour an interest in environmental issues.

BIG chairman Will Golding said: “We want to save this historic farmhouse and turn it into a community-run centre for learning, eating and exercise. Community ownership can give enormous opportunities for local communities to take control of assets, and create new, innovative and relevant services.”
A number of rival bids for the derelict property have already been received by the council
A number of rival bids for the derelict property have already been received by the council
A range of workshops and classes will be offered at the centre
A range of workshops and classes will be offered at the centre

2 Comments

CADMonkey
#1 Posted by CADMonkey on 28 Apr 2014 at 13:13 PM
When disposing of property is it not City of Edinburgh Council's obligation to obtain best value for the council tax payer, i.e. sell to highest bidder? If the building was listed that may put a different complexion on things.
Lindsay Buchan
#2 Posted by Lindsay Buchan on 5 Jun 2014 at 13:35 PM
Of course it is their obligation to obtain best value for the council tax payer but they don't do it. They try and sell property themselves rather than using Agents like everyone else. Different properties require different Agents because the right Agent can get a better price. Cammo Home Farm - great example, the council have been trying to sell it for years and have failed dismally. If it was given to the likes of Retties, S&P, Savills and marketed properly it would fetch a good price from a reliable purchaser.

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