Newsletter - Links - Advertise - Contact Us - Cookies
 

Cairngorms and A82 in-line for second wave of Scenic Routes projects

Bookmark and Share | Send to friend

February 19 2014

Cairngorms and A82 in-line for second wave of Scenic Routes projects
Young architects will be given the opportunity to develop ideas for a fresh batch of Scotland’s most arresting beauty spots after the Scottish Government committed a further £500k to its Scenic Routes initiative.

The project aims to capitalise on the country’s natural landscapes by commissioning architectural interventions such as shelters and viewing platforms, with the £500k pilot focussing on three beauty spots in the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park.

With that funding pot now hitting £1m sites in the Cairngorms and canals adjacent to the A82 will be in line for a similar makeover.

Rural affairs and environment secretary Richard Lochhead said: “Innovative viewpoints in areas of outstanding scenery will enhance the appreciation of Scotland’s landscapes and enrich journeys for both residents and visitors. It will also support rural economy and employment by creating additional interest and driving more people to the areas.

“Following the success of the first design competition it’s clear that we have some top architectural talent in Scotland and I hope the extension of this initiative will provide further opportunities for young architects to showcase their talents.”

The announcement coincides with the launch of an exhibition of winning and shortlisted entries for the pilot – to be held at Glasgow’s Lighthouse until 27 March.

9 Comments

Chris smith
#1 Posted by Chris smith on 20 Feb 2014 at 08:54 AM
Tell them to cut down all the scabby trees that litter the road obscuring the potentially lovely views!
Stephen
#2 Posted by Stephen on 20 Feb 2014 at 17:32 PM
Am concerned that these Scenic Routes markers are being designed by such inexperienced Architects (many of those that are eligible have not even yet become Architects, and most Architects are ineligible on the grounds of being too experienced). I'm afraid to my mind the quality of the submissions undoubtedly reflects this. The oft cited Norwegian example wasn't compromised in this way - they even brought in Peter Zumthor for one, yet he's ineligible for our version. Isn't this too great an opportunity, and potentially too important a project to restrict entry (and quality) to such an extent? Seems to me that finances are also a significant factor in the apparent 'benevolence' of this scheme towards offering an opportunity to our young architects and students...
Partick Bateman
#3 Posted by Partick Bateman on 21 Feb 2014 at 08:41 AM
I'm just concerned that they are being designed by architects. Most of them, so far, have shown very little sensitivity or relationship to place and seem far more interested in making an architectural statement backed up with some sort of cheesy retro-fitted concept.
hingwy
#4 Posted by hingwy on 21 Feb 2014 at 09:17 AM
Is that Hoskin's Scottish pavillion?
Matt Loader
#5 Posted by Matt Loader on 21 Feb 2014 at 11:54 AM
Quite to the contrary Stephen and Patrick. Opportunities to design public buildings by young/up and coming architects are all too hard to come by in the UK due to the onerous public procurement system we have in place. I applaud the Loch Lomond and Trossachs for undertaking this competition and limiting it to the younger generations and have every confidence that these projects will turn out fantastically well.
The Bairn
#6 Posted by The Bairn on 21 Feb 2014 at 12:06 PM
all very well but who pays for the long term upkeep and maintenance of these architectural gems? the council tax payer or do they just end up scabby and run down blots on the landscape!!
Stephen
#7 Posted by Stephen on 21 Feb 2014 at 17:35 PM
@ Matt Loader - I'm just afraid I don't have the same faith. The Scenic Routes will be advertised to tourists and have a high profile, so it needs to be good. I agree that up-and-coming practices/Architects should be encouraged but only if they're good enough, and that can be achieved with a standard, anonymous competition format (although all architecture competitions (free design work!?) are pretty ethically dubious IMO). To my mind the bar has been set too low and it shows in the schemes. I don't think this is going to be Norway 2.0, I think it'll be (manifestly) a poor man's version. Hope you're right though.
Craig Amy
#8 Posted by Craig Amy on 22 Feb 2014 at 20:35 PM
I tend to agree with all the points above but I feel that the 'up and coming' young practices are being unfairly omitted from these competitions. Those who have architects with greater experience but whose fledging domestic orientated practices would greatly welcome the opportunity to showcase their talent in the public realm and would massively benefit from the exposure that would bring on a national scale.
boaby wan
#9 Posted by boaby wan on 23 Feb 2014 at 22:06 PM
Translation of the quotes:
“Following the success of the first design competition it’s clear that we have some top architectural talent in Scotland..."
We have figured out that we can get things designed for free, rather than paying any of the talent.


"and I hope the extension of this initiative will provide further opportunities for young architects to showcase their talents.”
I hope we will continue to get young designers ideas without having to pay for them by using the carrot of the off chance that they might get an image published some where.

Post your comments

 

All comments are pre-moderated and
must obey our house rules.

 

Back to February 2014

Search News
Subscribe to Urban Realm Magazine
Features & Reports
For more information from the industry visit our Features & Reports section.