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JTP, Gillespies & Alan Dunlop place third in Shenzhen design competition

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January 30 2013

JTP, Gillespies & Alan Dunlop place third in Shenzhen design competition
A collaboration between JTP Architects, Gillespies and Alan Dunlop Architect has placed third in a design competition after being pipped at the post by two proposals from Shenzhen Design Institutes.

The competition was staged in a bid to develop a tourism blueprint for the Dapeng Peninsula of Shenzhen in Guangdong, China.

The 150 hectare region encompasses 120km of coastline, Kuanyinshan Mountain and Mirs Bay, all of which offer vistas toward Tung Ping Chau and Hong Kong.

Working in tandem with a tentative conservation area for the region the brief called for the creation of an ecological resort in harmony with local biodiversity.

Dunlop said: “I've been invited by the Mayor to Guangxi, near Vietnam and Liuzhou to visit the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Regional Committee and also the Liuzhou Urban Planning Bureau. In China, there is a  'Guanxi' which means relationship or bond. Very important when working with Chinese clients and something I'm looking to develop. 

"The Chinese client will consider Guanxi in any relevant relationships and projects, so the Shenzhen Institute had the advantage , still we came very close and it was a very positive experience working with JTP and Gillespies ”.

The same partnership is currently bidding for the development of a mixed use project in Shenyang.
A burgeoning Chinese middle class increasingly has the means to indulge in high-end recreational pursuits
A burgeoning Chinese middle class increasingly has the means to indulge in high-end recreational pursuits
A ferry port provides space for visitors to park their yachts
A ferry port provides space for visitors to park their yachts

A rum distillery featured as part of the proposals
A rum distillery featured as part of the proposals
The scheme masterplan illustrates the sheer scale of the bucolic development
The scheme masterplan illustrates the sheer scale of the bucolic development

This Alan Dunlop sketch depicts the view toward a public square
This Alan Dunlop sketch depicts the view toward a public square

26 Comments

rob
#1 Posted by rob on 30 Jan 2013 at 12:11 PM
In other news today ……..Scotland didn’t win the world cup

and Eddie the Eagle Edwards didn’t win the any medals in the Winter Olympics

why is not winning a competition “News”
urbanrealm
#2 Posted by urbanrealm on 30 Jan 2013 at 12:40 PM
Hi Rob - we always cover shortlisted work, not just the winners.
Neil
#3 Posted by Neil on 30 Jan 2013 at 12:48 PM
#1 outstanding work/ incredible drawings. IMO Worth seeing!
NIMBYism: Just Say No!
#4 Posted by NIMBYism: Just Say No! on 30 Jan 2013 at 13:00 PM
I assume you have no idea what it takes to be shortlisted in China "rob"?
David
#5 Posted by David on 30 Jan 2013 at 13:03 PM
'we always cover shortlisted work'

I'm sure an awful lot of architects would beg to differ there.
Andrew Brown
#6 Posted by Andrew Brown on 30 Jan 2013 at 23:03 PM
why are we architects (comments above) so bitter and stingy at the success of others, usually behind anonymity?! congratulations to Alan, JTP and Gillespies. Doesn't take a wild imagination to see potential Chinese wins down the road for them.
rob
#7 Posted by rob on 31 Jan 2013 at 08:19 AM
Correct …. I have no idea what it takes to be shortlisted in China

Similarly I have no idea what its like not to win a competition in China whilst trying dress it up as good publicity and at the same time insinuating that the other teams only won because they already had a good relationship with the Client
jonathan c
#8 Posted by jonathan c on 31 Jan 2013 at 12:02 PM
stunning work jtp , well done all
Andrew Lee
#9 Posted by Andrew Lee on 31 Jan 2013 at 12:47 PM
@Andrew Brown

Good question. I've commented before on the negative tone of comments on Urban Realm. For a site aimed at professionals in various fields, it attracts a surprising number of anonymous posters and trolls. Feedback and comment is only meaningful when we know its origin. I know that my clients often hesitate before allowing their projects to be featured on UR precisely because there are individuals itching to shoot down any story that raises its head above the parapet. At the beginning and end of any creative process, the maker is in a vulnerable position. They are sharing their vision or achievement with the public and their peers. The least someone who has strong opinions about their work can do is have the courage to supply their first and last names.
boaby wan
#10 Posted by boaby wan on 31 Jan 2013 at 13:11 PM
@ the andrews,
surely anyone connected to the profession knows that critique goes hand in hand with every single thing that we do - I don't think news articles on projects should be free from opinion.
why is feedback "only useful when we know its origin"? the anonimity of posting on the internet maybe means you get the actual thoughts of people rather than people worrying about offending egos, and let's face it, there's plenty of those around...
or how about we all just say everything is great and good and not discuss any issues with anything in case we sound "negative"
Andrew Lee
#11 Posted by Andrew Lee on 31 Jan 2013 at 15:55 PM
@ boaby wan

Of course critique is healthy. I've been through the art school system which shares the same "crit" culture as architecture education. The crits I remember, usually involved opening up the debate, asking questions as to intentions, what options were considered, why certain decisions might have been made, links to other work and practitioners etc. The goal is understanding someone else's practice and how that might inform our own practice. It is supportive rather than confrontational. Everyone has their opinions, including me, but sniping from the sidelines does no-one any favours. Why does it matter who is giving their opinion? Surely, it makes a difference whether a strong opinion comes from someone experienced and successful in their field or a practitioner who consistently produces poor-quality work themselves. Plus, anonymity tends to give people the licence to act in an uncivilised way: from road rage to cyberbullying.
boaby wan
#12 Posted by boaby wan on 31 Jan 2013 at 18:49 PM
This what I have never understood on here, why does it matter if opinion comes from an experienced, successful practicioner? Does no one else deserve a voice?
I hate the classic response on here when the only come back is "have you got a better scheme" - it totally avoids any answers to criticism...
Nimbyism:Just say no!
#13 Posted by Nimbyism:Just say no! on 31 Jan 2013 at 19:22 PM
#7 I have worked in China and only just returned after a four year stint in Hong Kong and then Shanghai. For a foreign company to make the final shortlist for such a prestigious project is remarkable and certainly news worthy, whether you think so or not. It is also true about the importance in China of 'Guanxi' and developing personal relationships with clients. It is certainly no surprise to me that the competition was won by the LDI and I will not be surprised either that if they borrow much of jtp, gillespies, alan dunlop ideas. That is the chance you take.

As for the work on display, the drawings are exceptional, to say otherwise would be churlish and worthy of inclusion as a news item. I was certainly happy to see them, so were my colleagues in Shanghai and they made a change for the overblown computer image we were mostly encouraged to develop for client presentations.
Neil
#14 Posted by Neil on 31 Jan 2013 at 20:45 PM
I think #13 has just answered your question boaby wan. Objective criticism is healthy and should be encouraged, stupid, ill informed and ignorant opinionsgiven without recourse or any idea of the the critics experienceor motive add nothing meaningful to any debate
boaby wan
#15 Posted by boaby wan on 1 Feb 2013 at 09:33 AM
Neil,
I don't see what has been answered there, my point is that everyone is entitled to opinion on buildings/schemes no matter what their background, the idea that because someone has worked on better projects gives them more weight in opinion than a layman is (to me anyway) quite ridiculous - I'll be honest, this is the first article I've seen that has published the third place for a design competition in a chinese competition, there is no mention of what/who won it, just a display of Alan Dunlops drawings - it would be more interesting to see this scheme in context with the others rather than celebrate Dunlops drawings (which happens very often on this site)
Rob
#16 Posted by Rob on 1 Feb 2013 at 09:36 AM
At no point in this thread has anyone given any negative view on the designs
David
#17 Posted by David on 1 Feb 2013 at 14:19 PM
Well said Rob and Boaby :D
jonathan c
#18 Posted by jonathan c on 1 Feb 2013 at 14:47 PM
Great to see drawings of this quality though, even without the designs. Brilliant! Keep it up URealm.
neil
#19 Posted by neil on 1 Feb 2013 at 16:45 PM
Interesting point of view boaby wan, of course everyone is entitled to an opinion no matter how obtuse, vague or ignorant. What is you opinion concerning nuclear fusion, recent advances in the treatment of cervical cancer or the spanish flu pandemic of 1918?
ha
#20 Posted by ha on 3 Feb 2013 at 19:53 PM
nice drawings indeed. As usual. However they seem to be describing a scottish coastal town. In any case it´s always hard to hit the right tone when you design for such a different culture, so nice job and congratulations
Andrew Lee
#21 Posted by Andrew Lee on 4 Feb 2013 at 10:11 AM
@boaby wan

I would never argue that you need to be trained in a certain field or be a senior member of the community to have a valuable opinion. In the projects dealt with on UR, there are any number of ways of responding: from the design and engineering point of view, but also degree of success as seen from the perspectives of the client, end-user and general public.

My point in not related particularly to this thread; it is directed against the knee-jerk, flippant cynicism that I read regularly on UR. And I would argue that anonymity encourages that tone.
boaby wan
#22 Posted by boaby wan on 4 Feb 2013 at 11:48 AM
nice one Neil, I would love to see how your attitude goes down in a public consultation meeting - no wonder the public think architects are arrogant with comments like that, or do you insist that everyone that talks first states their level of education and projects they have worked on before deciding how much you should bother with their opinion - I'll say it again, it would be much better to see these drawings in the context of the competition they were part of... rather than just a pat on the back for someone that can draw pretty hand drawings
The flâneur
#23 Posted by The flâneur on 4 Feb 2013 at 12:10 PM
Actually the reference to Scottish coastal towns is quite appropriate. The islands and waters around Hong Kong are curiously reminiscent of the Firth of Clyde though with a tropical edge. The landscape and hills have a similarly windswept feel to that of Scotland’s west coast.

Being familiar with the area in question these proposals are spot on in terms of grasping the context. They remind me of Hong Kong’s island villages of Cheung Chau and Peng Chau.

And the drawings are beautiful and evocative, as one would expect.
Walt Disney
#24 Posted by Walt Disney on 4 Feb 2013 at 13:10 PM
The drawings! Reminds me of Frank Ching and lovingly created 2 point perspectives. Happy days.
Nimbyism:Just say no!
#25 Posted by Nimbyism:Just say no! on 5 Feb 2013 at 11:44 AM
Well said #23, the proposals grasp the context perfectly and the drawings are beautiful and evocative. Again, very well done jtp, gillespies and alan dunlop and again thank you Urban Realm for including them.
John Glenday
#26 Posted by John Glenday on 5 Feb 2013 at 12:07 PM
Historic abuse of the comments system by a minority of users prompted a switch to a system of pre-moderation last year. A number of comments in this thread have fallen foul of this system and have not been published.

Urban Realm prides itself as an open platform for all to debate but with the freedom to post anonymously comes responsibilities - namely to refrain from personal attacks and unsubstantiated criticism.

If specific comments are judged to have breached these house rules they can be flagged for moderation by contacting us directly at enquiry@urbanrealm.com

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